Funding

 


 

Racial and Gender Discrimination, Tobacco Use, and Time Perspective Among Adolescents

Funding: Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program

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Two adolescents smoking

 

Dr. Mello (PI) received $619,228 to investigate the relationships among (a) tobacco use and co-use, (b) perceived discrimination based on race/ethnicity, immigration status, and gender, and (c) time perspective defined as thoughts and feelings about the past, present, and future.  The study has three aims: to (1) examine how adolescents’ perceived discrimination is associated with tobacco use, (2) determine how these relationships are moderated by time perspective, and (3) develop a preliminary curriculum based on this research that is informed by the community. The proposed study will occur in two diverse high schools in California. A mixed-method research design will be used that  comprises surveys and interviews. Community engagement will include participation by adolescents, parents, and teachers throughout the research process, including with the survey, findings, and curriculum.

 

This project was partially supported by funds provided by The Regents of the University of California, Tobacco-Related Diseases Research Program, Grant Number No. T31IP1855. The opinions, findings, and conclusions herein are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Regents of the University of California, or any of its programs.

 

 


 

Colorism and Tobacco Use Among Racial/Ethnic Minority Adolescents

Funding: Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program

Three adolescents smoking

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Dr. Mello (PI) received the Cornelius Hopper Diversity Award Supplement of $20,000 to extend the above study on racial and gender discrimination, tobacco use, and time perspective by including colorismperceived discrimination based on one's skin color.

 

This project was partially supported by funds provided by The Regents of the University of California, Tobacco-Related Diseases Research Program, Grant Number No. T31IP1855. The opinions, findings, and conclusions herein are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Regents of the University of California, or any of its programs.